Easy Chair Makeover with Chalk Paint® and Faux Fur

Confession: I’m a little bit of a chair hoarder. If I see a vintage chair at a flea market and it’s under $20 I usually end up coming home with it. The reason is because accent chairs are SO easy to salvage with minimal cost and effort, and also a good way to change up a corner in a room without going to too much trouble. Besides, who couldn’t use more stylish seating right?

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover with Chalk Paint®I got this bergere chair for $15 at my local flea market and thought it would be the perfect vessel for the magic of Chalk Paint® by Annie Sloan. There are a few reasons I like using Chalk Paint®. Firstly, it goes on beautifully and dries quickly with minimal brush strokes. Secondly, you can easily change the finish and look with Chalk Paint® Waxes. And finally, cleanup is a breeze! Soapy water is all you need for any spills and to clean brushes. For all of these reasons I highly recommend trying this method if you’re new to furniture painting.

For this project I wanted something whimsical with gentle color so went with the color Antoinette, which is a soft pink-lilac.

 

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover with Chalk Paint®

I gave the chair a good wipe down with soapy water and then just used a regular, old paint brush to cover the chair with two coats of paint.

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®

See how lovely and even it dries?

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®

Next I applied a coat of Chalk Paint® Wax to seal and add a nice finish the paint. I wanted to bring out the carvings and details in this piece so I used White Chalk Paint® Wax.

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®

I used a Wax Brush to apply a coat of wax to the entire painted surface.img_4630Make sure you get in all the nooks and crannies to bring out the details.Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®

Then use a soft cloth to remove any excess wax and buff out the finish.

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®Did you know you can paint fabric with Chalk Paint® as well? I thought about painting the seat with Pure White, but changed my mind and went with a luxe faux fur instead. Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®Quick tip: If you want to easily or temporarily change the upholstery on a chair like this, just use a throw and tuck it into the sides for a quick cover. Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®

Voila! An easy painted makeover! If you want to try Chalk Paint® for yourself (and you most definitely should) you can find Annie Sloan Stockists here.

Vintage Bergere Chair Makeover Using Chalk Paint®

I’m in love!

 

This project was sponsored by UNFOLDED but all opinions and ideas are my own. Promise.

 

Advertisements

DIY: IKEA VITTSJÖ Table Turned Chic Cocktail Ottoman

I have this problem where I envision something that I want and either it doesn’t exist or the closest thing I can find costs, like, a million dollars and still isn’t exactly what I had my heart set on. I have another little problem where I see something generic in a store and immediately start planning how I could change it to fit my personal style and make it, well, less generic. This happens way more often than you’d think. I’m all “Blahblahblah we can paint it and then cut this off and then maybe screw these together…” My husband stares at me for awhile before voicing his concerns, which I usually just brush off, and reply with a casual “It’ll be fiiiiine.”

And that’s what happened this time. I wanted a cocktail ottoman to use as a table and footrest, in some great color, probably tufted, with a little gold to tie in with the rest of the room. Couldn’t find it. When I saw the surprisingly sturdy VITTSÖ nesting tables at IKEA I instantly knew how I was going to make it happen. I would just need to upholster…and paint…and drill a little. NO BIGGIE. No, seriously, it’s a lot easier than it sounds.

vittsjo-nesting-tables-set-of-__0135349_PE292040_S4
I’m saving the smaller one for later.

Finding the perfect fabric was actually the most annoying part. I went to 4 different fabric stores before I found the perfect  green velvet at Deco Home for $80/yard. Totally worth it. It’s durable and lovely and perfect for a project like this. Exactly what I wanted.

ANYWAY, I’ll get down to it.

I put together the frame of the table and sprayed the entire thing with metallic gold spray paint. You can use whichever gold you like.Step1

I sprayed all the hardware and those little glass cushion sticker things gold, too.

Step2I picked up one yard of 2″ thick foam from the craft store and cut it to the size of the table. Using a sharp knife or blade makes it super simple. Just run the blade through a couple of times. You should maybe put cardboard or something down so you don’t slice up your floor.

Step3 Step4

The larger table in VITTSJÖ nesting tables set has a glass shelf on the top and a wood (MDF) shelf on the bottom, but since this is a hack, I switched them. Why? Because I needed to use the MDF for upholstering and tufting purposes. The glass shelf would be for holding books and cute decorative items while keeping a clean, floaty look.

After that I did some really annoying measuring and marked where I wanted my buttons to go. Ugh. Math is hard.

Step5

Then I used the multi-purpose drill bit on my Dremel to make the holes where I’d be pulling my tufting cord through.

Step7

I covered the foam and board in batting and my velvet. I pulled the fabric tight enough to round out all of the edges. The corners were tricky because of the metal nub where the top connects to the rest of the table. I just sliced the corner piece of fabric, pulled the fabric back around the piece of leg, and then stabled it securely into place. When I connected the pieces back together I just tucked any raw edges that were showing.

Step8

At this point you can leave it how it is or you can get fancy with tufting. I did a shallow tuft since this will be used as a table sometimes and I don’t want my serving trays to lay all wonky and wobbly on top. I also don’t want to be digging crumbs out of deep tufting craters after every shindig.

Tufting supplies will include polyester cord, a large upholstery needle, and some button covers
in the size of your choice.

Step9

These regular button covers are fine but if you’re using a thick fabric you might need to put in a little extra effort.

Step10

Instead of securing the fabric with the back of the button like you normally would, you might need to sew the fabric closed on the back using a heavy duty thread. I use “outdoor coat” thread. It works perfectly.

Step11

Thread a large upholstery needle with the polyester cord.

Step12

Find your holes on the bottom side of the board and push your needle through as straight as possible. Pull one end of the cord through to the top.

Step13

Use the needle to go through the back of the button and pull the end of the cord through.

Step14

Then put the needle back through the hole to bring the cord end back through to the bottom side.

Step15

Step16

Pull the cord tight and secure with staples. Stapling in multiple directions makes sure it doesn’t slip over time.
Step17

See? Shallow tufting.

Shallow Tufting TutorialNow it’s the best ottoman ever.

VITTSJO Ikea Hack VITTSJO IKEA Hack VITTSJO Ikea Hack VITTSJO Ikea Hack

Home Decor: New and Improved Dining Banquette Ikea Hack

You guys, I have slacked on updates for you. I am the worst. Remember that banquette I made awhile back (last year)? Remember how I wanted a different fabric and planned on changing it? Yeah I changed it…like…forever ago. The new canvas goes so much better with my original vision inspired by my favorite cafés in Paris and my own personal style. I’m hoping to score some new furniture and accessories for the new look too.

TADA!

Striped DIY Banquette-Ikea Hack

DIY Banquette Seat Ikea Hack DIY Banquette Ikea Hack

Ikea Hack Dining Banquette

I got this fabric at Ikea for $8/yard. It was fantastic to work with and is exactly what I originally intended for this piece.

Head over to the original tutorial for instructions on how I hacked this Ikea Expedit bookcase.