DIY: Stenciled “Welcome To The Shit Show” Door Mat

I’ve been in need of a new welcome mat for like a year now, but I haven’t found the right one that I loved enough to invest in. Luckily I spotted these colorful and inexpensive door mats at IKEA. I knew I could probably stencil my own design onto it, and for $8 I really had nothing to lose. It turned out perfectly and it’s totally me.

I couldn’t think of a more (in)appropriate way to welcome guests into my home than with “Welcome to the shit show”. There always ends up being something weird or unexpected happening when we have people over, so this is basically a fair warning of what you’re getting into when you come over.

DIY Stenciled Welcome MatTo make this happen, I had to first make a stencil. I printed my letters out and then used an exacto knife to cut the letters out of pieces of card stock.

DIY Stenciled Welcome Mat Tutorial

DIY Stenciled Welcome Mat TutoriallI repeated a letter in the beginning of each new stencil so I could align it with the last letter stenciled. That way everything would be in line properly.

After I decided where I wanted the stencils to go, I just taped them to the mat and used a sponge to put regular craft paint on.

DIY Stenciled Welcome Mat TutorialKeep the details of the letters by leaving pieces of them connected, you can fill them in later.

DIY Stenciled Welcome Mat TutorialUse a small brush to fill in any spots and do any touch ups that are needed. After it dries a bit you can use a small pair of scissors to clip away any mistakes and sharpen up the lettering.

DIY Stenciled Welcome Mat TutorialLet it dry over night before putting it out. I don’t know how well the paint will hold up to being stepped on, but I can always go back and do touch ups, so I’m not worried about it.

DIY Stenciled Welcome Mat

DIY Stenciled Welcome Mat

Home Decor: Colorful Vintage Illustration Gallery Wall // DIY Gallery Wall Tips

I’m always changing things up in this small, little apartment of mine. I was craving a little more color on my living room walls, so I planned on ditching the large abstract canvas and doing a gallery wall instead.

The LA Apartment of Melodrama blogger Krys MeloI’d been thinking about doing a gallery wall for awhile but art, even prints in the quantity I needed, were turning out to be too expensive for my project’s budget. I’m a big fan of vintage illustrations like the kind you’d find in The Saturday Evening Post, so when I came across a bunch from the 1950s, I ran to get frames immediately. Ok, more like power walked.

Framed vintage illustrations for gallery wallGallery walls can be scary! Whether you’re doing a random pattern or lining them up strategically, putting that first hole in the wall is scary business when you’re not sure if you’re going to like how it’s all laid out once it’s up there. I hate patching nail holes more than anything, and I don’t even know where the touchup paint is, so I had to get this right the first time.

Gallery wall tip - Use paper cutouts with nailholes marked first to get the right arrangement without putting unnecessary holes in your walls

One of my favorite tips for creating gallery walls is to cut pieces of paper to the size and shape of your wall decor. Mark where all of the nails should go, and tape the paper pieces up on the wall to get a better idea of where everything will go. I rearranged my pieces at least 4 times until I got a spacing I was happy with. Measuring is fine, but I like to actually see everything up on the wall before I start making holes. Once I was happy with it, all I needed to do was hammer the nails into the pre-marked paper.

Vintage Illustration Gallery Wall from Melodrama

I hung every picture up and used a level to make sure they were all straight and in line, because when one is out of place everything looks wacky. That’s something I’ll probably have to go back and do every once in awhile but it’s SO WORTH IT. If you have a problem with your pictures staying straight, try using a little piece of gum tack on the back corners of the frame.

Vintage Illustration Gallery WallThe illustrations add a lot of fun color and fun vintage character into the room. I’m definitely happy with it.

Vintage Gallery Wall from Melodrama blogger LA Apartment

Christmas Decor At Our House 2014

Yay Christmas! We’re ready. A lot of things have changed around here lately. We got a new sofa, I made some new art and pillows, and we got new tables and lamps (more on that later).

This year I went with a silver, gold, black, and white theme for our tree. Most of the ornaments are from Target, IKEA, or vintage. I also DIY’d some marbled ornaments. It’s totes glam and I love it. I can stick with it for a few years since it’ll go with any decor color scheme I happen to have going on. You know I like to change my mind about that lot.

Christmas at the home of blogger Krys Melo of Melodrama

 

Tada! Merry Christmas!

 

DIY: IKEA FADO Lamp Turned Jack-o-Lantern

I can be a bit of a Halloween traditionalist, you guys. I like my October nights lit by the faces of Jack-o-lanterns and I like those Jack-o-lantern faces to be classic. However, I still like to mix things up sometimes, and get serious, it’s not exactly practical for me to have carved pumpkins sitting around as light sources for the entire month. When I saw the orange FADO at IKEA, I didn’t just see a colorful orb lamp, I saw a potential Jack-o-lantern.

fado-table-lamp__0275795_PE413950_S4

The FADO is a pretty cool lamp on its own. It has a spherical shape that is a throwback to the mid-century space age era and it gives off a nice, soft, glowing light.

Pulling this off is really as simple as drawing or painting a Jack-o-lantern face onto the lamp. I used chalk to draw my ideal face shapes and then painted over it using a charcoal colored chalk paint. You can use a sharpie, a paint pen, or whatever you’d like. I just liked the chalk paint texture against the frosted glass of the FADO. It also looked more vintage to me that way.

IKEA FIDO Lamp turned Jack-o-Lantern

I love this little guy. Look how cute he is! And the glow sets the perfect mood light for Halloween movie watching.

IKEA FIDO Lamp turned Jack-o-Lantern

 

DIY: How To Make Your Own Decorative Halloween Candles

It’s almost time to break out the Halloween goodies! If you like DIYing your way throughout the holidays, this is the craft for you.
DIY Halloween Candles

I’m pretty into candles. They make great decorations, they add pretty light to a room, and sometimes they smell pretty good. Have you seen some of the prices on decorative candles though? Oof. Just get crafty and make your own.

You need the following things:

Candles
Wax Paper
Tissue Paper
Rubber Stamps or InkJet Printer
Colored Pencils and Pens
Heat/Embossing Tool or (very hot) Blowdryer

First, you start with tissue paper. Place your image on the shiny, smooth side of the paper. You can use a rubber stamp, draw your own image, or use a printer to create your images. Then cut them out as close to the edge as possible.

DIY Stamped Halloween Candles

If you’re not a rubber stamp collector or a particularly great drawer and prefer to print your images like I did, just tape a piece of tissue paper to a piece of standard printer paper and feed it through. You can find images and clipart to download all over the internet. Resize them in a photo editing program to fit your candle size.

DIY Halloween Candles

Color them in with pencils and add additional details with a ballpoint pen if you want.

DIY Halloween Candles

Once you’re done with that it’s time to adhere the images to the candle. Use a little bit of glue stick to stick your tissue paper to the candle.

DIY Halloween CandlesDIY Halloween Candles

Then wrap a piece of wax paper around the candle and over your tissue paper cut-out. Use your heat tool to melt the wax paper. You’ll know when it’s melted because the image will get clearer and you won’t be able to see the edges of the tissue paper cut-out anymore. I used a heat gun but a very hot blowdryer will work as well. Using your blowdryer’s concentrator nozzle attachment is a good idea. Don’t over do it! You don’t want to warp the candle. DIY Halloween CandlesDIY Halloween Candles

Once you peel off the wax paper you’ll see that the tissue paper cut-outs are embedded and sealed in a new later of wax. Make sure you use a fresh piece of wax paper for each candle to get a clean, smooth finish.
DIY  Halloween CandlesDone! Simple custom DIY printed decorative Halloween candles.

DIY  Halloween Candles

DIY: IKEA VITTSJÖ Table Turned Chic Cocktail Ottoman

I have this problem where I envision something that I want and either it doesn’t exist or the closest thing I can find costs, like, a million dollars and still isn’t exactly what I had my heart set on. I have another little problem where I see something generic in a store and immediately start planning how I could change it to fit my personal style and make it, well, less generic. This happens way more often than you’d think. I’m all “Blahblahblah we can paint it and then cut this off and then maybe screw these together…” My husband stares at me for awhile before voicing his concerns, which I usually just brush off, and reply with a casual “It’ll be fiiiiine.”

And that’s what happened this time. I wanted a cocktail ottoman to use as a table and footrest, in some great color, probably tufted, with a little gold to tie in with the rest of the room. Couldn’t find it. When I saw the surprisingly sturdy VITTSÖ nesting tables at IKEA I instantly knew how I was going to make it happen. I would just need to upholster…and paint…and drill a little. NO BIGGIE. No, seriously, it’s a lot easier than it sounds.

vittsjo-nesting-tables-set-of-__0135349_PE292040_S4
I’m saving the smaller one for later.

Finding the perfect fabric was actually the most annoying part. I went to 4 different fabric stores before I found the perfect  green velvet at Deco Home for $80/yard. Totally worth it. It’s durable and lovely and perfect for a project like this. Exactly what I wanted.

ANYWAY, I’ll get down to it.

I put together the frame of the table and sprayed the entire thing with metallic gold spray paint. You can use whichever gold you like.Step1

I sprayed all the hardware and those little glass cushion sticker things gold, too.

Step2I picked up one yard of 2″ thick foam from the craft store and cut it to the size of the table. Using a sharp knife or blade makes it super simple. Just run the blade through a couple of times. You should maybe put cardboard or something down so you don’t slice up your floor.

Step3 Step4

The larger table in VITTSJÖ nesting tables set has a glass shelf on the top and a wood (MDF) shelf on the bottom, but since this is a hack, I switched them. Why? Because I needed to use the MDF for upholstering and tufting purposes. The glass shelf would be for holding books and cute decorative items while keeping a clean, floaty look.

After that I did some really annoying measuring and marked where I wanted my buttons to go. Ugh. Math is hard.

Step5

Then I used the multi-purpose drill bit on my Dremel to make the holes where I’d be pulling my tufting cord through.

Step7

I covered the foam and board in batting and my velvet. I pulled the fabric tight enough to round out all of the edges. The corners were tricky because of the metal nub where the top connects to the rest of the table. I just sliced the corner piece of fabric, pulled the fabric back around the piece of leg, and then stabled it securely into place. When I connected the pieces back together I just tucked any raw edges that were showing.

Step8

At this point you can leave it how it is or you can get fancy with tufting. I did a shallow tuft since this will be used as a table sometimes and I don’t want my serving trays to lay all wonky and wobbly on top. I also don’t want to be digging crumbs out of deep tufting craters after every shindig.

Tufting supplies will include polyester cord, a large upholstery needle, and some button covers
in the size of your choice.

Step9

These regular button covers are fine but if you’re using a thick fabric you might need to put in a little extra effort.

Step10

Instead of securing the fabric with the back of the button like you normally would, you might need to sew the fabric closed on the back using a heavy duty thread. I use “outdoor coat” thread. It works perfectly.

Step11

Thread a large upholstery needle with the polyester cord.

Step12

Find your holes on the bottom side of the board and push your needle through as straight as possible. Pull one end of the cord through to the top.

Step13

Use the needle to go through the back of the button and pull the end of the cord through.

Step14

Then put the needle back through the hole to bring the cord end back through to the bottom side.

Step15

Step16

Pull the cord tight and secure with staples. Stapling in multiple directions makes sure it doesn’t slip over time.
Step17

See? Shallow tufting.

Shallow Tufting TutorialNow it’s the best ottoman ever.

VITTSJO Ikea Hack VITTSJO IKEA Hack VITTSJO Ikea Hack VITTSJO Ikea Hack